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School acknowledges travel risks

Chris Campbell, of Sierra Leone, is nervous about the Ebola virus affecting his family back in his home country. Campbell stays connected to them through Skype.—Paul Bossua/ TRUMPET
Chris Campbell, of Sierra Leone, is nervous about the Ebola virus affecting his family back in his home country. Campbell stays connected to them through Skype.—Paul Bossua/ TRUMPET

Wartburg has been taking precautionary measures to ensure the safety of its students due to the current Ebola outbreak.

One of these precautions include an email sent to all students before the 2014 Fall Break telling students about certain cautionary procedures they needed to take before travelling to infected areas.

“The email was to let students know that we are keeping track of what the CDC’s regulations and policies are for schools concerning Ebola,” Katie Tanner, interim director of international programs, said.

So far no student has contacted Tanner about going to affected areas and there has been no need for concern, Tanner said.

She said the concern for students travelling to the affected regions isn’t as high as it used to be.

“We don’t have a lot of students that would like to travel to those areas since countries like Nigeria are off the list,” Tanner said.

The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) is asking schools to be vigilant and to identify students, faculty and staff who traveled to affected areas over the summer.

Students, faculty and staff who were abroad over the summer were to report to the Noah Heath Center if they had any symptoms.

“There were no problems and all of our students were very cooperative,” Tanner said.

Both international and local students had similar reactions to the email sent to Wartburg students  before 2014 Fall Break.

“I think it’s good that they are trying let people know what is going on right now, but how many international students actually leave for five days anyway,” Terris Sallis, said.

“It is good that they are trying to keep track of people traveling to those areas but I felt they were overreacting,” Christian Campbell said.

Campbell, from Sierra-Leone, said he is frightened for his family members who are back in his home country.

Campbell said he spoke to his family on Skype and they said the situation in Sierra Leone is bad but not as bad as the media makes it.

“Everyone back home is extra cautious, people don’t interact as much as they used too,” Campbell said.

Tanner has also been keeping track of students coming to Wartburg in January and there are no students coming from infected areas.

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